While seniors were still celebrating the culmination of their University careers, Prof. Martha Ludwig celebrated her own unique achievement. Ludwig, a University professor of biological chemistry and research scientist in the biophysics research division, was one of 72 individuals elected to the National Academy of Sciences. The prestigious organization was commissioned by Abraham Lincoln in 1863. It is currently based in Washington D.C.

“Ludwig’s election to NAS reinforces our faculty’s reputation for conducting scientific research of the highest quality and impact,” said William L. Smith, the Minor J. Coon Professor of Biological Chemistry and department chair, in a written statement.

Ludwig’s fellow researchers also commented on the implications of the election on their department.

“The honor will no doubt enhance the biophysics research department, and help it to attract top-quality students, post docs and faculty,” Prof. Erik Zuiderweg said in a written statement.

Since her arrival at the University, the focus of Ludwig’s research has the study of complex proteins. Her work has been useful in appraising the harm incurred by various cardiovascular diseases.

“I’ve been looking at proteins that require vitamins to do their chemistry. I like seeing the translation of my research to application,” Ludwig said.l

After receiving her PhD from the Cornell University Medical College, Ludwig joined the University’s biochemistry department in 1967. She has specialized in X-ray crystallography as a means to study proteins for 36 years.

“It’s a mark of recognition for the University as well. It’s a great place to do some really exciting work. People here really get involved with what they’re doing and it’s just been a really good environment to be in,” Ludwig said.

Inductions into NAS are familiar to several faculty members of the biochemistry department. The division has had more electees to the Academy than any other in the medical school, with fellow protein researcher Prof. Rowena Matthews enjoying the honor last year, said University Medical School spokeswoman Sally Pobojewski.

Many representatives of the medical school have enthusiastically commented on Ludwig’s Apr. 29 election.

“Professor Ludwig is such a dedicated scientist. People in the medical school are absolutely thrilled,” Pobojewski said.

“Martha Ludwig is a pioneer in her field. Her research has been outstanding…she is truly well deserving of this great honor,” said Prof. Ayyalusamy Ramamoorthy, a fellow biophysics researcher.

Despite the celebrity of her distinction, Ludwig remains focused on her contributions to the University. In addition to her endeavors as a researcher, Ludwig has managed the Biophysics training grant and supervised funding allocations for the Michigan Life Sciences corridor.

“She single-handedly managed the grant and has played a great role in shaping the division,” Ramamoorthy said.

With regard to the future, Ludwig intends to continue her protein research.

“It’s been a great ride so far, and I think it’ll go on for a while,” Ludwig said.

require vitamins to do their chemistry. I like seeing the translation of my research to application,” Ludwig said.

After receiving her PhD from the Cornell University Medical College, Ludwig joined the University’s biochemistry department in 1967. She has specialized in X-ray crystallography as a means to study proteins for 36 years.

“It’s a mark of recognition for the University as well. It’s a great place to do some really exciting work. People here really get involved with what they’re doing and it’s just been a really good environment to be in,” Ludwig said.

Inductions into NAS are familiar to several faculty members of the biochemistry department. The division has had more electees to the Academy than any other in the medical school, with fellow protein researcher Prof. Rowena Matthews enjoying the honor last year, said University Medical School spokeswoman Sally Pobojewski.

Many representatives of the medical school have enthusiastically commented on Ludwig’s April 29 election.

“Professor Ludwig is such a dedicated scientist. People in the medical school are absolutely thrilled,” Pobojewski said.

“Martha Ludwig is a pioneer in her field. Her research has been outstanding … she is truly well deserving of this great honor,” said Prof. Ayyalusamy Ramamoorthy, a fellow biophysics researcher.

Despite the celebrity of her distinction, Ludwig remains focused on her contributions to the University. In addition to her endeavors as a researcher, Ludwig has managed the Biophysics training grant and supervised funding allocations for the Michigan Life Sciences corridor.

“She single-handedly managed the grant and has played a great role in shaping the division,” Ramamoorthy said.

With regard to the future, Ludwig intends to continue her protei research.

“It’s been a great ride so far, and I think it’ll go on for a while,” Ludwig said.

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