Five years ago …

Faculty from the College of Literature, Science and the Arts
approved a resolution at a meeting yesterday to allow students to
complete academic minors.

More than 50 faculty members unanimously approved the change to
the faculty code to add minors to the LSA curriculum.

During the meeting, representatives of the LSA Student
Government implored the faculty to approve the resolution, which
had already been voted on by the curriculum committee and the LSA
executive committee. “Peer universities offer the option and
don’t lose credibility by doing so,” LSA-SG
representative Steve Sharpe said.

March 2, 1978

In light of the upcoming Spring Break, Daytona Beach police in
conjunction with Daytona’s City Hall and Chamber of Commerce
sent memos to all major northern state universities, warning of
local ordinances which prohibit heavy partying.

“We get lots of Michigan plates down here,” said
Daytona Police Sgt. Jim Penkins. “By Easter week we get
200,000 kids — there’s so many you can stir them with a
stick.

“During that week we may arrest 1,000 to 1,500
students,” he added.

According to Jenkins, the most abused ordinance prohibits
carrying or consumption of an open alcoholic beverage on the beach
of city streets. “Students come to have some fun, sun and
drink a few beers,” Jenkins said. “They take the risk
and get caught.”

March 6, 1986

One of the nation’s largest defense contractors —
Lawrence Livermore Laboratories — cancelled its job
recruitment after students planned to protest its presence on
campus.

But a Livermore human resources representative said the
cancellation was because no one signed up for interviews, not
because they feared protesters.

Michigan Alliance for Disarmament member and Rackham student
Justin Schwartz said, “It’s equally fine by me if they
cancelled because of pickets or because no one signed
up.”

March 2, 1935

Athlectic director Fielding Yost helped two fratenity pledges
complete their initiation tasks, thereby saving them from being
assessed “black marks” and winning the staunch support
and admiration of both.

The two pledges were asked to make a topographical map of the
University golf course and count the number of bricks in the south
Ferry Field wall.

The two pledges saw Yost in the Michigan Union and thought he
could tell them where the wall was located. Yost did know —
but he didn’t stop there.

He drove the two initiates to the Athletic Department
administrative offices in his car and quickly disposed of their
problems by going into his office and drawing a map from the huge
plan of the golf course hung above his desk.

The second problem was more difficult. The three went out and
measured the wall with the aid of a board procured by Yost. It was
reported that after a heated argument and the application of
advanced mathematics, Yost and the two initiates came to an
agreement on the number of bricks in the wall.

March 5, 1985

The University lost a bid to receive funding from the National
Science Foundation for one of four supercomputer centers across the
country.

The NSF instead chose Princeton University, the University of
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Cornell University and the University
of California at San Diego to receive the $40 million machines.

Nuclear engineering Prof. William Martin said while present
research projects in the department will not suffer, the computers
could have “started some new projects” at the
University.

March 6, 1968

Six members of the College Republicans traveled to New Hampshire
primary to support George Romney for president, only to find out he
had withdrawn from candidacy.

While on their way, they were shocked to hear on the radio that
Romney dropped out of the race.

“Our first reaction was to cry. We felt a sense of
futility at traveling 1600 miles and not accomplishing
anything,” Britt Procter said.

March 7, 1951

By an extremely narrow seven to six margin, the
University’s Student Affairs Committee yesterday voted to
require all campus organizations to remove discriminatory clauses
from their constitutions by 1956 or be denied official University
recognition. The action, which only needs the approval of the
University president to go into effect, culminated more than two
years of effort and agitation by a host of campus groups and
student leaders.

— Compiled by Daily News Editor Tomislav
Ladika.

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