Amid the excitement of Saturday’s football game against
Michigan State, students might have noticed — or participated
in — some of the rowdiest behavior ever at the Big House.

Police say 21 arrests were made in Michigan Stadium during the
game — the largest number of arrests at a football game in
the Department of Public Safety’s records. Prior to Saturday,
the most arrests at a football game were 11 at the game against
Notre Dame in September 2003.

Sixteen of the arrests at Saturday’s game were given to
minors in possession of alcohol, while one was for possession of
marijuana and four for assault.

Most of the arrests involved students. Seven of the arrests were
for University students — six for MIP and one for assault.
Three Michigan State students were arrested, all for MIP. Four
other students arrested were from Western Michigan and Eastern
Michigan universities.

DPS spokeswoman Diane Brown said the arrests were mostly
alcohol-related.

“The assaults were drunk people beating up on each
other,” Brown said.

Brown said the problems occurred mostly before the game and
during the first half. She attributed the high levels of drinking
to the later time of the game.

“It was a 3:30 game and people get up and start drinking
first thing in the morning,” Brown said.

Some students witnessed first hand the unruly behavior that DPS
tried to combat at Saturday’s game.

“There was a girl behind me. She and her friends were
trying to weasel in between my friends and I. She had seats five
(rows) behind,” LSA senior Chris Gansen said.

Gansen said when he asked the women to move, they refused and
became obnoxious. “They started kicking me in the
back,” Gansen said.

“An usher came down and chastised the girls for being too
rowdy,” Gansen added. He also said he didn’t understand
why the women — who weren’t arrested — caused
such a ruckus when they planned to leave at halftime. “They
made a big deal over nothing,” Gansen said.

Yet many students were too absorbed with the action and
excitement of the game to see any disorderly behavior. “I
didn’t really notice anything out of the ordinary,” LSA
sophomore Bob Kovats said.

Other students said the behavior at the game was relatively
tame. “Considering we were losing for so long, I thought that
there would be more students freaking out,” LSA sophomore
Rachelle Mika said.

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