This Office of Greek Life and the Interfraternity Council have
begun investigating the fight that broke out last Friday night
between the Delta Kappa Epsilon and Sigma Alpha Epsilon
fraternities at the DKE house.

The University also responded to criticism of the Ann Arbor
Police Department’s handling of the incident.

Vice President for Student Affairs E. Royster Harper said the
University has sought assurance from the AAPD that in the future it
will take violence at fraternity houses more seriously.

“I think they are going to be more responsive, and I think
they understand that fights and violence aren’t childish
play. People can get hurt,” Harper said.

The AAPD received criticism earlier this week when Sgt. Tom
Seyfried told The Michigan Daily that the department did not pursue
the fighting and vandalism because it considered the incident
“childish nonsense.”

SAE president Dustin Nelson said after first establishing
contact with DKE, his fraternity is now working to resolve the
issue within the house.

“Our second step was to discuss the matter internally and
figure out which individuals were responsible. We have narrowed it
down to about eight brothers and two current pledges,” Nelson
said.

He also said his fraternity will discipline any members involved
in the situation, citing community service as an example of a
planned disciplinary measure.

“We are taking this event very seriously. We’re
taking this event as individuals making the decisions and not as a
house,” Nelson said.

DKE President Alex Dengel declined to comment on the
situation.

Nelson added that a couple SAE members received facial bruises
and one was more severely beaten.

But despite the fighting and broken windows at DKE, the AAPD did
not issue any citations for property damage or assault. Lt. Mark
Hoornstra of the AAPD said one citation for a minor in possession
of alcohol and one citation for improper identification were
issued.

“For destruction, it indicates that no one wanted to
prosecute, according to the report,” Hoornstra said.
“It says in the report that the officer took one of the
people from each fraternity and they agreed to exchange phone
numbers of the presidents of each.”

“They both indicated at the time of the report that they
wanted to resolve the issue between the two fraternities and did
not want to pursue criminal charges,” he added.

Because neither fraternity chose to file charges against the
other, Hoornstra said the AAPD will not investigate the situation
further. He added that if the two fraternities were to change their
minds and decide to file charges, a detective and prosecutor would
decide what to do next.

“If we can let them resolve it on their own, it helps to
save the court system and everybody a lot of time and
effort,” he said.

Assistant Director of Greek Life John Duncan said his office
plans to mediate between the houses.

“We’re in the process of gathering information.
I’m touching bases with the chapter presidents of both
organizations to get an accurate account of what occurred last
Friday night. It’s nothing formal — we’re just
trying to touch bases and get everything in order,” Duncan
said.

He added that the Department of Greek Life is looking into
another fraternity’s involvement in the incident, but has
been unable to confirm the identity of a third fraternity.

“We want to figure out everyone’s involvement before
we move forward,” IFC president Casey Bourke said. “If
it needs to be, it will go through (IFC’s) judicial
system.”

Hoornstra said he was surprised at the amount of interest shown
in the incident so far, especially by the media.

“To me, it doesn’t seem that there is anything
different than with other ones in town. These aren’t the kind
of things that catch our attention — that we discuss in crime
meetings — unless there happens to be a fraternity that we
keep going back to time and time again,” Hoornstra said.

In addition to the administration, some members of the Greek
community expressed concern about the AAPD’s attitude toward
the violence that occurred last Friday.

“I think we all pay taxes and everyone deserves the
services of the Ann Arbor Police Department,” Bourke
said.

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