America’s immoral and incongruent policies toward Iraq have caused irreparable damage, according to a film produced by Arab Film Distribution titled “Hidden Wars of Desert Storm,” which was shown last night in Angell Hall.

Shabina Khatri
ASHLEY HARPER/Daily
Author Max Elbaum speaks to a crowd after the screening of “Hidden Wars of Desert Storm,” a story about the Gulf War.

The movie claimed the only reason the U.S. military is involved in Iraq for its oil and that the U.S. government has been actively lying to the world about its role in the Middle East for decades.

It also asserted that the current economic sanctions on Iraq are immoral and hurting the country’s people, rather than Saddam Hussein’s regime.

“I think it is important to look at the history of U.S. engagement in the region. (The movie) gave the viewers an insight of what truly motivates the U.S.,” said LSA senior Fadi Kiblawi, chair of Students Allied for Freedom and Equality, which organized the event.

“The discourse surrounding the war has really been ignorant of U.S. engagement in the region,” Kiblawi added.

SNRE senior Jake Davidson, who came to see the film because of his anti-war stance, said although he thought the film was sensationalistic, he was glad to see it raise certain issues.

“The effects of the sanctions are incredible, especially the things that have been held back like vaccines,” Davidson said.

LSA sophomore Mazin Hiwisli, who said he attended the event because he has lineage in the Middle East, liked the film because it enlightens people about what the Iraqi people are going through.

“I thought it was very educational. I think it gives a perspective our media doesn’t show,” Hiwisli said.

The movie, which lasted 60 minutes, included several images of sick and dying Iraqi people in an effort to show the consequences of economic sanctions.

“Are we no better than (Saddam)? We are no better than the terrorists of 9/11. We are killing innocent civilians,” Hiwisli said.

“It was emotionally stressful seeing little kids who needed care,” Hiwisli added.

“Seeing pictures of Iraqi children hits the hardest,” Kiblawi said.

The movie featured commentary from state department officials, Operation Desert Storm Cmdr. Norman Schwarzkopf, investigative reporters, Iraqi citizens and Arab leaders.

The movie was followed by a discussion with Author Max Elbaum, who described American military involvement in Iraq as a “racist massacre against the people of Iraq” and as “naked colonialism.”

rant of U.S. engagement in the region,” Kiblawi added.

SNRE senior Jake Davidson, who came to see the film because of his anti-war stance, said although he thought the film was sensationalistic, he was glad to see it raise certain issues. The effects of the sanctions are incredible, especially the things that have been held back like vaccines,” Davidson said.

LSA sophomore Mazin Hiwisli, who said he attended the event because he has lineage in the Middle East, liked the film because it enlightens people about what the Iraqi people are going through. “I thought it was very educational. I think it gives a perspective our media doesn’t show,” Hiwisli said.

The movie, which lasted 60 minutes, included several images of sick and dying Iraqi people in an effort to show the consequences of economic sanctions.

“Are we no better than (Saddam)? We are no better than the terrorists of 9/11. We are killing innocent civilians,” Hiwisli said.”It was emotionally stressful seeing little kids who needed care,” Hiwisli added.

“Seeing pictures of Iraqi children hits the hardest,” Kiblawi said.

The movie featured commentary from state department officials, Operation Desert Storm Cmdr. Norman Schwarzkopf, investigative reporters, Iraqi citizens and Arab leaders. The movie was followed by a discussion with Author Max Elbaum, who described American military involvement in Iraq as a “racist massacre against the people of Iraq” and as “naked colonialism.”

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