Former University of Michigan Health System resident Stephen Jenson is now facing federal charges of possessing child pornography and receiving child pornography via the internet, according to an affidavit filed yesterday with the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan.

The U.S. Secret Service filed the affidavit, alleging that Jenson possessed 97 images and four videos of “suspected child pornography” on electronic devices seized in a Dec. 2, 2011 search warrant executed by detectives from the University’s Department of Public Safety.

Last May, a medical resident found a USB thumb drive plugged into a computer in a resident’s lounge at the University Hospital that contained suspected child pornography and determined that it was Jenson’s. She later reported her findings to her supervisor who then notified the Health System Legal Office, though DPS was not properly notified until late November, according to an internal report released by the University on Friday.

Rather than graphical representations of child pornography, the affidavit notes that agents observed depictions of “real children engaged in sexually explicit conduct.”

Jeff Frost, special agent in charge of the U.S. Secret Service’s Detroit field office, confirmed in an interview yesterday that his office filed the federal charges.

“We frequently work these types of investigations with our partners in the Michigan State Police and the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force as well the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children,” Frost said. “This is one of those cases that was worked.”

The federal affidavit does not explicitly mention the hospital’s delay in reporting the incident to the DPS. However, it notes that the resident reported her findings on May 24 after she discovered that the thumb drive was missing, with the next statement showing that the hospital reported the incident to DPS on Nov. 21.

According to the U.S. Department of Justice’s website, the FBI typically handles child pornography cases, but Frost said jurisdictions overlap in many cases.

“If we’re asked to assist any law enforcement organization, we’re certainly going to provide our assistance,” Frost said.

U.S. Attorney Matthew Roth will represent the federal government in the case. Roth could not be reached for comment as of yesterday evening.

Jenson is currently represented by Ann Arbor attorney Joseph Simon as he faces state charges of four counts of possessing child sexually abusive material. However, in an interview yesterday evening, Simon said he will not represent Jenson in the federal case, adding that the state charges will most likely be dismissed at Jenson’s preliminary exam today in Ann Arbor District Court.

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