Viewpoints

How can straight people — survivors or otherwise — be allies to the LGBTQ community both generally and in the context of sexual assault and intimate partner violence?

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has.”

- Margaret Meade

Time and time again, Muslim students have found the administration absent when its support was needed most. Muslim students feel unsafe, unwelcome and unheard in a space that is meant to be inclusive of all identities.

If the University of Michigan is supposed to be one of the most liberal campuses in the country, I shudder to think what it is like on other campuses. Like many others who entered the University last fall, I came under the impression that this campus was an oasis of tolerance and diversity.

America should always be a place where a person who is willing to work hard has a fair shot to get ahead and have success in life, no matter his or her background.

“Stop Islam”

“Trump 2016”

“Build the Wall”

This Sexual Assault Awareness Month, I stand with survivors who are too often silenced by a culture that refuses to believe them.

I advocate for survivors who never told anyone, not even their best friend, their mom, their partner.

Grow up. You are not an adult until you learn to respect other people. You cannot count your college years as free passes to be assholes, at least, not when it comes at the cost of the safety of others.

The first time I had a seizure was one of the most terrifying and confusing events of my life. Everything that happened was a fog.

What comes to mind when you hear “social innovation?” Is it entrepreneurship? Technology? Big ideas? When I hear “social innovation,” I think optiMize. I think unity, trust, family and community — the real things that will inspire people to change the world.