Columns

Between the dawning of the Harbaugh Era, the opening of Mcity and the renovations on North Campus, the summer of 2015 was by no means uneventful. One Ann Arbor resident, Joshua Wade, has been particularly busy.

Doing nothing will not stop the mass shooting that might occur tomorrow somewhere in the United States, but something, anything, might save a life. And a life is certainly about more than nothing.

Enjoy your work, and you’ll create your own happy future.

This past summer, while most Michigan students interned, worked, traveled or took classes, I climbed out of a deep pit of emotional turmoil.

Just because oppression is not visible to the majority of the population does not mean it is less significant.

I’m taking the noose from around my young, lotion-less neck, so my voice can say, out loud, to the mirror: I love you. So I can say those words until they are just like my body: perfectly and beautifully mine.

I don’t remember exactly when it started or what it stemmed from. If I had to guess, I would say a fear of failing, the future or the butterfly effect; I’m dramatic that way. Whatever the cause, I had developed a behavior that fogged my brain: I was indecisive.

Health care and public health sectors would be very well served to step up their game by attempting to get more celebrities, communications and P.R. professionals involved in meaningful health campaigns, demonstrating an understanding that investing in a great campaign is worth as much as a pair of Yeezy exclusive sneakers.

This summer, I did one of the most childish things I could think of: I got my tonsils out.

We, as members of active campus communities, should denounce sexist cultures and work to end high rates of sexual assault. But to do so we need to be aware of and challenge the problematic attitudes that continue to pervade society.

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