Gymnastics

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As Evianna Roberson climbed onto the beam, she received the full attention of all in attendance at Crisler Center. Her performance was the last of the meet, and with a perfect score, she would force a tie between her No. 17 Washington and the No.

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Lock-in.

Washington women's gymnastics coach Elise Ray-Statz greets one of her players at a meet.

Elise Ray was at a crossroads. After finishing her career as a gymnast at Michigan, she’d performed for Cirque du Soleil for three years, then worked briefly as a trainer and broadcaster. Like many athletes whose careers had come to an end, Ray wasn’t sure what was next. So she called Bev Plocki, her college coach, and asked for advice. A decade after that first call of advice, the two women — at the helm of their own programs in Michigan and Washington — scheduled a meet against each other. It should have been perfect, a coach and her protege, reunited where it all began, this time as competitors.

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Kurt Golder looks for only one thing when his No. 3 Michigan men’s gymnastics team has intrasquad meets: consistency.

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An exhibition match is usually one to give the seniors and captains a solid pre-season tune-up. It’s an opportunity to give the freshman a walkthrough at Crisler Center for what’s to come. But they aren’t supposed to be the ones carrying the team.

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Four.

The number of freshmen on the Michigan womens gymnastics team.

Three.

After missing most of her first three seasons due to injury, senior Maggie O'Hara is excited to finally get back to competition.

O’Hara is not unfamiliar with injury. During both her freshman and sophomore season, she suffered from concussions: the first after a bad mount on bars resulted in a fist to the head, and the second after a poor overshot ended with a whiplash into the mat. O’Hara’s days of competition were over for the time being. With continuous recovery programming, O’Hara eventually got better — only to have her dreams of getting back to competition derailed once again at the end of her sophomore year.

The Michigan women's gymnastics team is looking to clinch its 18th Big Ten Championship since 2000 this season.

Walking into the Donald R. Shepherd Gymnastics Center, it’s near impossible to miss the maize and blue championship banners that hang in rows all across the ceiling.

The 1970 national championship men's gymnastics team held a 50-year reunion Friday night.

When trampoline champion Goerge Huntzicker discovered his championship ring was missing two years ago, he phoned Rapper — the team’s captain — to ask how to get a new one. These types of rings are hard to come by, so Rapper thought it was worth it to reach out to the whole team to see if other players lost their rings too. The wheels began turning in his head and, soon enough, the idea snowballed.

The Michigan women's gymnastics team placed third nationally, highlighted by a national title on beam by freshman Natalie Wojcik.

The Wolverines would have to finish top two — the finals advancement cutoff — in a field with No. 2 UCLA, No. 4 LSU and No. 6 Utah. Instead, they settled for a third place finish, scoring 197.2000.