Film

NOSELL

The idea of being anything older than 35, even 30 really, instills the kind of dread that can only come from living in a society that values youth and beauty and measures success by how much you can get done in a short period of time.

NOSELL

Minari has a lot of names. I’m not talking about the film, but its namesake, Oenanthe javanica. For the uninitiated, it’s an herb used in a variety of cuisines, prepared by itself or added to elevate an existing dish. In Korea it’s called minari; in Japan, it’s called seri.

NOSELL

So, people are mad at the best voice actor in “Shark Tale” again. 

NOSELL

Most of Disney’s animal-related films have been animated, colorful musicals. “Flora & Ulysses,” on the other hand, takes the kid-with-an-animal concept and applies it to a live-action film.

NOSELL

“Supernova” opens in total darkness. Slowly, stars emerge. One shines brightly, then disappears.

NOSELL

“Only Yesterday” is my favorite Studio Ghibli film, hands down. Its story is simple: Taeko, a 27-year-old woman living in Tokyo, takes a couple of days off from her mundane job in the city to work in the countryside, where she helps farmers as they prepare for the safflower harvest.

NOSELL

After his alarm goes off and he takes his breakfast to go, Mark (Kyle Allen, “All My Life”) goes through a repetitive morning, throwing an empty coffee cup into a garbage truck approaching at just the right time. He gives a pedestrian directions before she asks.

NOSELL

The studio that enchanted us as children with Hayao Miyazaki’s “Spirited Away” and “My Neighbor Totoro” has released its first film in six years. “Earwig and the Witch” is a far cry from these old-school illustrated films, venturing into the world of 3D CGI.

NOSELL

It’s the end of an era. As I sat down to watch the third and final installment of the “To All the Boys” trilogy, I reflected on the last three years of these movies.

NOSELL

Jenny Slate (“Gifted”) cries a lot in “Obvious Child.” My sister makes fun of me because I have a running list of the best crying faces in film (at the top is Rooney Mara in “The Social Network”), and she reminds me that the ability to cry on camera doesn’t automatically meet the crit