MIC

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As a freshman, I struggled a lot because I felt out of place and unwelcomed due to all of the racism that was happening on campus at the time.

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Candidly speaking (as always, of course), I joined MiC because I love to talk about myself. I first learned about this group at the encouragement of fellow peers on the MiC staff.

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I joined MiC because when I got to college, I really wanted to find a space where I could be myself and pursue my passions while surrounded by like-minded people.

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For much of my life, my identity as a woman of color was rooted in embarrassment. I hid my weekend activities, which were always Carnatic music class, Bharatanatyam class, and Bala Vihar (study of Hindu scriptures).

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As a little girl, nothing brought me more joy and excitement than dancing. My parents recognized this and were quick to enroll me in dance classes, in an attempt to encourage my curiosity for the performing arts.

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During my first semester writing for the Michigan Daily I noticed myself wanting to write more about my experience as a freshman of color. Because what I’ve realized the past several months is how much race seemingly plays a significant role in creating new relationships.

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I want to learn myself. I want to learn my power of voice. I want to learn my heart, my trials, my confusions, and my strength. I often shy from that which I fiend for: self-love, affection, my own art, my own words and thoughts. When I say shy from, I mean avoid.

Na'kia Channey, MiC Co-Managing Editor

“won't you celebrate with me

what i have shaped into

a kind of life?” - Lucille Clifton

Carly Ryan

There’s a unique vulnerability in attaching your name to words, having them printed 7,500 times and distributed to every building on campus.

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I took this photo through the window of my car on May 16th, 2018 in Nazareth, Israel. On this day Israel-Palestine saw nationwide peaceful protests and demonstrations. These were against the Trump administration’s decision to move the U.S.