Schlissel joins statement of support for undocumented students

Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 1:58pm

The University of Michigan released a statement Monday expressing concern for the future of students who may be undocumented immigrants and pledging to urge the federal government to continue the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

“At the University of Michigan, we are very concerned about the status and safety of all students, including international students and those who may be undocumented,” the statement read.

DACA, instituted by Obama in 2012, allows undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States before their sixteenth birthday to pay a fee to receive protection from deportation and a temporary work authorization. Roughly 750,000 people were issued temporary protection under the policy, which could be reversed under the next president because it is an executive order.

Ninety other college administrators also released statements Monday expressing support for students under DACA as signatories to a nationwide petition organized by Pomona College President David Oxtoby, which University of Michigan President Mark Schlissel signed.

According to a University press release, moving forward Schlissel plans to set up a committee on immigration issues that will be composed of faculty, staff and students in part to address these issues.

The statement follows a campus petition to Schlissel requesting continued protection of undocumented immigrant students, signed by more than 1,000 students, faculty and staff.

Initiated by Silke-Maria Weineck, professor of German Studies and Comparative Literature and member of the Senate Advisory Committee on University Affairs, the petition asks Schlissel to use his voice as the president of a prominent university to call for continued protection of child immigrants.

It also notes that President-elect Donald Trump has made statements indicating he will overturn all executive orders instituted by President Obama, including DACA.

“We focus on DACA students because they are particularly vulnerable groups since Trump said he would rescind the DACA order,” Weineck said.

The letter also recognizes the University administration's recent campaign to increase diversity at the University. The Diversity, Equity & Inclusion plan, launched in early October, outlined a variety of steps the University plans to take to create a more inclusive campus.  

“I feel confident in President Schlissel and have faith he will take action as one of the leading institutes for higher education in the country,” Weineck said.

The University of Michigan released a statement Monday expressing concern for the future of students who may be undocumented immigrants and pledging to urge the federal government to continue the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

“At the University of Michigan, we are very concerned about the status and safety of all students, including international students and those who may be undocumented,” the statement read.

DACA, instituted by Obama in 2012, allows undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States before their sixteenth birthday to pay a fee to receive protection from deportation and a temporary work authorization. Roughly 750,000 people were issued temporary protection under the policy, which could be reversed under the next president because it is an executive order.

Ninety other college administrators also released statements Monday expressing support for students under DACA as signatories to a nationwide petition organized by Pomona College President David Oxtoby, which University of Michigan President Mark Schlissel signed.

According to a University press release, moving forward Schlissel plans to set up a committee on immigration issues that will be composed of faculty, staff and students in part to address these issues.

The statement follows a campus petition to Schlissel requesting continued protection of undocumented immigrant students, signed by more than 1,000 students, faculty and staff.

Initiated by Silke-Maria Weineck, professor of German Studies and Comparative Literature and member of the Senate Advisory Committee on University Affairs, the petition asks Schlissel to use his voice as the president of a prominent university to call for continued protection of child immigrants.

It also notes that President-elect Donald Trump has made statements indicating he will overturn all executive orders instituted by President Obama, including DACA.

“We focus on DACA students because they are particularly vulnerable groups since Trump said he would rescind the DACA order,” Weineck said.

The letter also recognizes the University administration's recent campaign to increase diversity at the University. The Diversity, Equity & Inclusion plan, launched in early October, outlined a variety of steps the University plans to take to create a more inclusive campus.  

“I feel confident in President Schlissel and have faith he will take action as one of the leading institutes for higher education in the country,” Weineck said.