Visual Statement: Coming Up Rosies

Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 7:48pm

The Rosies wait for the official picture to be taken in Hangar 1 of Willow Run Airport. The airport was one of the country's largest bomber plants during World War II, producing B-24 Liberator planes in only an hour.

The Rosies wait for the official picture to be taken in Hangar 1 of Willow Run Airport. The airport was one of the country's largest bomber plants during World War II, producing B-24 Liberator planes in only an hour. Buy this photo
Allison Farrand/Daily

 

2,096 women gathered at the historic Willow Run Bomber Plant on Saturday, October 24th in search of a Guinness World Record. Each one wore blue coveralls, work boots, and a red and white polka-dot bandanna to reclaim the record for the number of Rosie the Riveters gathered in one place. The participants, some as young as one year-old, joined forty-three original "Rosies," women who worked at the plant during World War II. The plant was one of the country's largest bomber plane producers during the war and the workplace of Rose Will Monroe, the inspiration for Rosie the Riveter. While the official count is still being validated by Guinness, it appears that the women will soon hold the record. 

2,096 women dressed as Rosie the Riveter gathered at Willow Run Airport on Saturday, October 24th to reclaim the Guinness World Record.

2,096 women dressed as Rosie the Riveter gathered at Willow Run Airport on Saturday, October 24th to reclaim the Guinness World Record. Buy this photo
Allison Farrand/Daily

Two-year-old Kaylee Klostermeier, from Pittsford, waits with her mother and sister while the other 2,093 Rosies check in and explore vintage planes.

Two-year-old Kaylee Klostermeier, from Pittsford, waits with her mother and sister while the other 2,093 Rosies check in and explore vintage planes. Buy this photo
Allison Farrand/Daily

Five-year-old Audrey Myers, from Monroe, colors in a Rosie the Riveter poster as she waits with her mother for the photo to be taken.

Five-year-old Audrey Myers, from Monroe, colors in a Rosie the Riveter poster as she waits with her mother for the photo to be taken. Buy this photo
Allison Farrand/Daily

 Lindsey Martinez, of Monroe, pins a polka-dot bandanna on her two-year-old daughter Mackenzie.

Lindsey Martinez, of Monroe, pins a polka-dot bandanna on her two-year-old daughter Mackenzie. Buy this photo
Allison Farrand/Daily

Forty-three of the women were "original Rosies," women who worked at the Willow Run Bomber Plant during World War II. The inspiration for Rosie the Riveter, Rose Will Monroe, came from Kentucky to build planes.

Forty-three of the women were "original Rosies," women who worked at the Willow Run Bomber Plant during World War II. The inspiration for Rosie the Riveter, Rose Will Monroe, came from Kentucky to build planes. Buy this photo
Allison Farrand/Daily

Frances Reeck, of Adrian, wears pins of her daughters and granddaughters dressed as Rosie the Riveter. Mrs. Reeck worked at the bomber plant during the war and was one of forty-three "original Rosies" in attendance.

Frances Reeck, of Adrian, wears pins of her daughters and granddaughters dressed as Rosie the Riveter. Mrs. Reeck worked at the bomber plant during the war and was one of forty-three "original Rosies" in attendance. Buy this photo
Allison Farrand/Daily

The Rosies wait for the official picture to be taken. The women entered the staging area through turnstiles to reach the final count of 2,096.

The Rosies wait for the official picture to be taken. The women entered the staging area through turnstiles to reach the final count of 2,096. Buy this photo
Allison Farrand/Daily

The forty-three women in the front of the picture were "original Rosies," Willow Run Bomber Plant employees during World War II.

The forty-three women in the front of the picture were "original Rosies," Willow Run Bomber Plant employees during World War II. Buy this photo
Allison Farrand/Daily