Trump’s inaugural address divides campus

Friday, January 20, 2017 - 4:27pm

President Donald Trump at a rally in Novi, MI on September 30, 2016.

President Donald Trump at a rally in Novi, MI on September 30, 2016. Buy this photo
Zoey Holmstrom/Daily

 

Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States of America at noon on Friday. In his inaugural address, he encouraged Americans to unite through patriotism and promised to give citizens a stronger voice in the federal government.

“Today, we are not merely transferring power from one administration to another or from one party to another, but we are transferring power from Washington D.C. and giving it back to you, the people,” Trump said.

In addition to attacking the status quo in Washington D.C., Trump also sought a uniting tone and said a common sense of patriotism will bring citizens together regardless of race.

“It's time to remember that old wisdom our soldiers will never forget, that whether we are black or brown or white, we all bleed the same red blood of patriots,” Trump said.

Continuing in that vein, Trump also explicitly mentioned the city of Detroit and said those born across America all share similar aspirations. Trump promised the problems of Americans would not be ignored during his presidency.  

“Whether a child is born in the urban sprawl of Detroit or the wind-swept plains of Nebraska, they look up at the same night sky, they will their heart with the same dreams and they are infused with the breath of life by the same almighty creator,” Trump said. “So to all Americans in every city near and far, small and large, from mountain to mountain, from ocean to ocean, hear these words: You will never be ignored again.”

Trump also used the speech to reiterate his foreign policy mantra of “America First” and said it will be part of his vision to put citizens' interests first.

“We assembled here today are issuing a new decree to be heard in every city, in every foreign capital and in every hall of power,” Trump said. “From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this day forward, it's going to be only America first, America first.”

LSA junior Enrique Zalamea, president of the University of Michigan’s chapter of College Republicans, said Trump’s inauguration speech inspired him, as he values Trump’s inclusive tone and common sense of patriotism.

“I can’t tell you how excited I am for the next four years,” Zalamea said. “Just listening to his speech today was truly inspirational; it was truly a beautiful moment for not just Republicans, but for all Americans, and he really made that evident as he talked about inclusivity of all people.”

On the other hand, Collin Kelly, chair of the University’s chapter of College Democrats, said he felt the speech was divisive and he and other Democrats will continue to stand up for what they believe in.

“It was kind of pessimistic and kind of dark; he tried to erase the progress that’s been made over the past eight years,” Kelly said. “We’re just ready to continue fighting for what we believe in, what we know is right. This is our time to stand — really the most important time of our lives.”