UM leads as 1st in research for 7th consecutive year

Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 11:34pm

The University of Michigan was ranked No. 1 in research and development spending among all U.S. public universities by the National Science Foundation, marking the University’s seventh consecutive year holding this title. Following the University is University of California, San Francisco, and University of Washington, Seattle.

In the 2016 fiscal year, the University spent $1,436,448,000 dollars in research and development, surpassing UCSF by more than $100,000,000.

LSA junior Gaby Fabré works with research in the political science department, and expressed her appreciation of the research opportunities available for students on campus.

“Research is important because it allows for both individuals and communities to take that extra step forward in providing an understanding of a bigger picture in the grand scheme of things. It also opens up an academic dialogue in order to achieve that goal,” she wrote in an email.

The federal government accounts for 54.8 percent of the University’s expenditure for research and development, while other sources include state and local government, institution funds, businesses and nonprofit organizations.

LSA freshman Annika Mursten works with UROP, investigating small screen media and scroll culture, focusing largely on social media businesses like BuzzFeed as well as individual consumption of this media. She expressed enthusiasm for continuing her work next semester, and has continued to expand her interests in behavioral and social research.

“Whether we notice it or not, while watching our favorite pizza and late night snack videos, we are absorbing heavy product placement and advertising,” she said. “Overall, I am very thankful to be participating in research and I know that I wouldn’t be able to have this experience at any other place.”

LSA senior Jensyn VanZalen works with the Extracorporeal Life Support Program and researches extracorporeal membrane oxygenation there, investigating the development of artificial placenta, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and neonatal artificial lungs. She recognized the value of having undergraduate involvement in research at the University, especially in collaboration with research professionals, all at different stages within their own careers.

“I would love to see U-M research to continue to reach out to more of the undergraduate population to get involved, because I can attest to how invaluable my experience has been, being involved in research,” VanZalen said. 

Correction appended: A previous version of this article incorrectly cited the University spent $1,436,448 dollars in research and development, surpassing UCSF by more than $100,000. The numbers have been corrected to $1,436,448,000 dollars and $100,000,000, respectively.