Community Culture

NOSELL

As a high school student, I remember asking my friends if they’d be interested in coming with me to various classical music concerts. We’d dress nicely — not too nicely, of course — and sit in the faraway student-ticket sections of incredibly high-end concert venues.

NOSELL

To Matthew Ozawa, director of the University production “A Beautiful Country,” the COVID-19 pandemic has felt like “having the rug ripped from under you.” The intended opening night of “A Beautiful Country” was April 2, but, like so many other productions, the show has been canceled. 

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Last weekend, Outta This World Booking, a local booking group I spoke with a few columns ago, put out a

Life at home during COVID-19

Waking up for my 9 a.m. lectures has been considerably harder since classes shifted online.

NOSELL

My biceps started to ache as I rapidly whisked the sad, watery coffee-ground mixture with the manic fervor of a small child. Eyebrows furrowed and lips pressed together in a stubborn line, I was the poster image for culinary determination.

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In these uncertain and lonely times, I find joy in my photos and string lights.  When I packed up my dorm room and flew home to Seattle, I was aware that I would not be returning to freshman year as I knew it.

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Farewell, our adopted Michiganders. Sudden virus has taken the Midwest, turned it upside down and shook the life out of it like an old piggy bank. Streets are empty. Human interaction has vanished from our lives. Memories of people hang like smoke in the room.

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My grandfather has run out of coffee. Every morning, he mixes a blend of Colombian dark roast from Costco that he pours into a thermos to keep hot for the rest of the day. No milk, no cream and no sugar. Just coffee.

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The best of it is remembering. Quiet daydreams of times when a hug wasn’t something to be afraid of.

The worst of it is remembering. Waking up to the new world I’m forcibly growing accustomed to.