Books

David Sedaris

I am enthralled with Sedaris’s eye for the strange, and for how he manages to juxtapose his own trials with the oddities he comes across.

Meg Ryan in "When Harry Met Sally"

The media available to me as a child and teenager taught me that romantic love was the most important pursuit of my life.

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Good essays about reading expose it in all its contradiction: both intimate and public, solitary and expansive.

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In the Daily newsroom exists a leaning stack of prerelease books, relegated next to a filing cabinet. Too often I would give the pile no more than one passing glance. But in a flitting once-over, I recognized a certain name along one spine: Questlove.

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Early in the pages of “Circe,” the recent novelization of the Greek goddess’s life, Madeline Miller describes a meeting between the titular character and Prometheus.

“Registers of Illuminated Villages” was the stand out work as part of two weeks of dedicated poetry events at Literati Bookstore.

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Billy Joel's and Elton John’s Face to Face tour came to Buffalo, New York, in March of 2010, and it was the first concert I ever attended. Sitting eagerly in the stands of the massive, sold-out HSBC Arena, I was 12 years old and knew the majority of the men’s discographies by heart.

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Straight from the title, “Lion Cross Point” places high literary stock in animals. Birds, mammals and sea creatures populate its pages, enclosed by prose in this paper zoo.

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It’s almost impossible to read Meg Wolitzer’s latest novel, “The Female Persuasion,” and not see it as thematically inextricable from our present political moment.

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In another life, Curtis Sittenfeld could have been a psychologist. Instead, she became a writer — and thank god she did. Sittenfeld is a keen, careful observer of human behavior and her first collection of short stories, “You Think It, I’ll Say It,” is aptly named.