Books

NOSELL

Images of fiery red skies and an ominous smoky gloom from California’s wildfires recently circulated on social media, providing a terrifying reminder of the effects of human civilization on the natural world.

NOSELL

If written differently, “Apeirogon” by Colum McCann would feel like a burden. It is, after all, a commitment of over 450 pages of heart-wrenching content, based on the true story of two fathers who lost their young daughters to senseless violence arising from the Israeli-Palestine conflict.

NOSELL

Looking for a socially distanced way to spend Halloween without missing out on the spooky spirit? Here are five Halloween reads that will make you feel less alone this Halloween. Make sure to check under the bed and in the closet every few pages.

“Burnt Sugar,” Avni Doshi’s debut novel, has been selected for the 2020 Booker Prize shortlist.

The words in Avni Doshi’s “Burnt Sugar” hit you like a bullet. Doshi doesn’t mind that they come with a burden. “It’s easy to unravel when no one is watching,” she writes within ten pages of the novel. It is, I find myself thinking. In fact, it would be so easy to unravel right now. 

NOSELL

Every so often a book comes along that is so puzzling, so brutal and so honest that you almost want to keep it a secret.

The concept is simple: Take a book, leave a book in return.

Reading has always been a solitary activity for me. When I checked out books at the public library as a child, I knew that those books were mine alone for the next two weeks. I read for hours while curled up on the couch, oblivious to everything except the words on the page.

NOSELL

Most of us like to think we have a handle on our lives. We make careful plans, we budget, we organize, all so that when we come home after a long day, we have the peace of mind to enjoy a few moments of relaxation before getting back to business the next day.

NOSELL

Aimee Nezhukumatathil’s poetry is meant to be read at mid-morning with a cup of coffee slowly warming your hands.

NOSELL

I would love to say that the reason I reread “Brave New World” was my immediate recognition of the connections between Huxley’s original dystopia and the current situation in the United States, but the real reason is less intellectual: I watched the Peacock adaptation.

NOSELL

I stayed up late the night of Nov. 8, 2016, eager to see the culmination of countless scandals, debates and upsets. I already knew the outcome: Donald Trump’s debate performances were catastrophic, his poll numbers were abysmal and his own party wasn’t fond of him.