Books

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In the Daily newsroom exists a leaning stack of prerelease books, relegated next to a filing cabinet. Too often I would give the pile no more than one passing glance. But in a flitting once-over, I recognized a certain name along one spine: Questlove.

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Early in the pages of “Circe,” the recent novelization of the Greek goddess’s life, Madeline Miller describes a meeting between the titular character and Prometheus.

“Registers of Illuminated Villages” was the stand out work as part of two weeks of dedicated poetry events at Literati Bookstore.

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Billy Joel's and Elton John’s Face to Face tour came to Buffalo, New York, in March of 2010, and it was the first concert I ever attended. Sitting eagerly in the stands of the massive, sold-out HSBC Arena, I was 12 years old and knew the majority of the men’s discographies by heart.

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Straight from the title, “Lion Cross Point” places high literary stock in animals. Birds, mammals and sea creatures populate its pages, enclosed by prose in this paper zoo.

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It’s almost impossible to read Meg Wolitzer’s latest novel, “The Female Persuasion,” and not see it as thematically inextricable from our present political moment.

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In another life, Curtis Sittenfeld could have been a psychologist. Instead, she became a writer — and thank god she did. Sittenfeld is a keen, careful observer of human behavior and her first collection of short stories, “You Think It, I’ll Say It,” is aptly named.

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A gloriously stunning debut novel, Jana Casale’s “The Girl Who Never Read Noam Chomsky” follows Leda, a college student in Boston, as she navigates her life and identity over the years.

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Two weeks ago, The Daily spoke with award-winning author Weike Wang, whose debut novel “Chemistry” is a sparse, sharply written and deeply reflective character study of a young woman struggling with pursuing a doctorate in the eponymous field.

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‘Lawn Boy’ elevates the traditional young adult novel with its introspective narrator and avoidance of cliche, shallow plotlines.