Men's Basketball

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In what may kindly be deemed a defensive struggle — and not so kindly, a downright ugly game — the twenty-third ranked Wolverines improved to 17-5 overall and 6-3 in Big Ten play with a 62-47 win over Rutgers.

Michigan men’s basketball coach John Beilein is preparing for another aggressive defense in Rutgers on Sunday.

Michigan could finish with a lackluster total this Sunday. Rutgers possesses a stronger threat than its record indicates.

Junior center Moritz Wagner and Michigan's offense was stifled by Nebraska's pick-and-pop defense on Thursday night.

Nebraska switched on every ball screen, leaving no room for Michigan to attack the hoop and preventing Moritz Wagner from getting open looks from 3-point range.

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LINCOLN – The Michigan men’s basketball team ended its game against the Cornhuskers with the Nebraska crowd chanting the name of the Wolverine’s best player. They were mocking junior forward Moritz Wagner.

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Thursday, as is the nature of the Big Ten schedule, the Wolverines will face another potential bullet — this time in the form of Nebraska.

Michigan in a game against Maryland at Crisler Monday.

Free throws can be an anticlimactic way of hitting a milestone.

Junior forward Moritz Wagner scored a career-high 27 points in Michigan's victory over Michigan State on Saturday.

All game long, when the Wolverines needed a spark, they looked to Wagner.

Michigan in a game against Michigan St. at the Breslin Center Saturday. Michigan won 82-72.

Led by Moritz Wagner's career-high 27 points, Michigan earned a signature victory on the road.

Sophomore guard Zavier Simpson scored has upped his game lately, and he's taking control of the point guard position.

On Tuesday, against No. 5 Purdue, Simpson dropped 15 points again in a last-minute, one-point loss. And it was the manner in which Simpson scored those points that was most impressive.

Freshman forward Isaiah Livers (#4) and freshman guard Jordan Poole (#2) have proven that late-game moments aren't too big for them anymore.

A far cry from precluding freshmen from playing in the second half, Beilein is now finding as many ways as possible to utilize his first-year players.