B-Side

Wikimedia Commons

In the past, artists could hide behind the shield of a stage-name, a wig or an eye-catching outfit. However, in the digital age it is becoming more and more difficult for anyone –– celebrity or regular Joe –– to maintain privacy.

Netflix

“Roma” is verbally a nostalgia piece (Cuarón told IndieWire that “90 percent of the scenes” came straight from his memory). The filmmaker leans on what he knows and what he can recall, bringing the events of his childhood to life in crisp, clean, digitally captured black and white.

Pexels

With every record I felt heavy in my hands as I put it on the turntable, I could feel the weight of my father’s love for each song, entangled with my own so many years down the line.

Leni Sinclair

And though the era cannot be so easily replicated, it can certainly teach us all something. These Ann Arbor street corners have thousands of stories to tell — we should be listening.

Madeleine Virginia Gannon / Daily

My grandfather has always loved music with all his heart. I imagine that just like me he would have been content to never let his feet leave the dance floor.

Moody Air Force Base

You’re forming memories in this moment and you don’t even know it.

File Photo / Daily

I’ve spent an embarrassingly long time looking at websites that ranked the best college libraries. The Michigan Law Library appeared every time, and I added an asterisk beside the University to signal its edge.

A speaker at The Moth

Nostalgia as a raw emotion is something powerful, but when crafted into a story and weaved throughout other feelings, it becomes a tool for connection and understanding. Instead of simply being a means of entertainment, it becomes a piece of art.

NBC

There are no blouses or neckties. There are no complex patterns or tight fits. It’s not meant to stand out, and the biggest brand these urbanites shop is The Gap.

Nickelodeon

“HIS MOM IS TOO THICK FOR A WHITE WOMAN!” Baked yelled. “HAVE YOU SEEN ME?” Buzzed replied. I shoved another handful of popcorn into my mouth, wondering what the feminist implications of cartoon body image could be. This remained unanalyzed, but we all agreed that the sister was, ahem, “a c*nt.”