Trina
Pal
Thursday, August 27, 2020 - 5:28pm
NOSELL

Sally Cole-Misch dedicates her debut novel, “The Best Part Of Us,” to “every living thing.” An environmental communicator by profession, Cole-Misch refers to more than just humans or other animals. Her dedication encapsulates the entire natural world. Clusters of birch trees, steep rocky cliffs, vast lakes and bays — Cole-Misch recognizes that everything around us is living, pulsing, with energies unique to its spirit. 

Wednesday, July 1, 2020 - 6:25pm
NOSELL

Every time I see someone tread off a beaten trail, crushing plants in their wake, my heart crumples inside. “They’re just plants,” is the usual response I’m met with, words that cut inside me further. Plants may seem insignificant, partly due to their size and their position below our eye level. Humans are fascinated with animals larger than themselves — elephants or killer whales, for example — but aren’t thrilled by a small shrub. 

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 - 6:55pm
NOSELL

This piece is a part of a series on "Art during COVID," an exploration of art forms to keep our idle minds creative during this pandemic. With many of us at home, our minds have ample time to wander, wonder and create. This series highlights accessible and immersive art forms to both produce and consume during the pandemic months and beyond.

 

Wednesday, June 3, 2020 - 5:48pm
NOSELL

This piece is part of a series on “Art during COVID,” an exploration of art forms to keep our idle minds creative during this pandemic. With many of us at home, our minds have ample time to wander, wonder and create. This series highlights accessible and immersive art forms to both produce and consume during the pandemic months and beyond.

 

How do we show our gratitude for the world around us? 

Wednesday, May 20, 2020 - 5:32pm
NOSELL

This piece is part of a series on “Art during COVID,” an exploration of art forms to keep our idle minds creative during this pandemic. With many of us at home, our minds have ample time to wander, wonder and create. This series highlights accessible and immersive art forms to both produce and consume during the pandemic months and beyond.

Thursday, May 7, 2020 - 9:14am
NOSELL

This piece is part of a series on “Art during COVID,” an exploration of art forms to keep our idle minds creative during this pandemic. With many of us at home, our minds have ample time to wander, wonder, and create. This series highlights accessible and immersive art forms to both produce and consume during the pandemic months and beyond.

 

Wednesday, April 8, 2020 - 12:41pm
NOSELL

To Matthew Ozawa, director of the University production “A Beautiful Country,” the COVID-19 pandemic has felt like “having the rug ripped from under you.” The intended opening night of “A Beautiful Country” was April 2, but, like so many other productions, the show has been canceled. “It’s been a crushing blow to see so many artists out of work and so many companies on the brink of closing,” Ozawa said.

Monday, April 6, 2020 - 6:28pm
Life at home during COVID-19

Waking up for my 9 a.m. lectures has been considerably harder since classes shifted online. Every dreaded Wednesday and Thursday I drag myself out of bed, mumble good morning to my parents who have been working diligently for two hours already, assemble some breakfast and haul my laptop and meal back upstairs to my room in one trip. I’ve gotten the timing down well — if I wake up at 8:45 a.m., I can do all this and arrive the acceptable five-minutes-late to my Zoom class with a hot cup of coffee in my hands.

Wednesday, March 18, 2020 - 5:12pm
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It’s only been six days since the first coronavirus cases were reported in Michigan, but it feels like an eternity has passed. My heart sinks every time I see another student moving out of their dorm, lugging mattress pads and portable fans across the street to waiting cars. I’ve temporarily moved back home myself and visited Ann Arbor earlier this week to see a ghost town. Empty parking spots were scattered all along South University that should’ve been filled with cars at 1 p.m. on a Monday.

Tuesday, February 18, 2020 - 10:41am
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“Can we be careful of those bells on the floor there?” shouted Malcolm Tulip, assistant professor in the Department of Theatre & Drama and director of “Yerma,” in the middle of my interview. His voice reverberated through the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, bouncing off the historic walls with intensity. A student on stage, unfazed, snatched up the golden bundle immediately before turning back to the scene. A Thursday night rehearsal of “Yerma” was in full swing, and gloriously so.