Monday, October 26, 2020 - 5:27pm
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When biologist and statistician J.B.S. Haldane was asked by theologians what insights could be drawn about the Creator from the study of His creation, he allegedly replied “an inordinate fondness for beetles.”

That’s because, at a known 350,000 species in the order Coleoptera, there are more beetles than any other kind of animal on Earth. And that’s just the beetles — not any of their insectile cousins like bees and ants, nor other creepy crawlers like spiders and scorpions. Not to mention all the wormy guys, squishy slugs and crustaceans we dine on with gusto …

Monday, October 19, 2020 - 5:36pm
All this to say, the Japanese horror film “Ring” and the technological anxieties it taps into may be as timely as ever.

Halloween is a month-long celebration that spans decades of movie history, from Southern Gothic to psychothriller. The Film Beat decided to embrace this history, dedicating each week of October to a different time period in horror. This series celebrates every nightmare you had when you were ten, every creak in the floorboards of an old house, every piece of candy stuck to the inside of your pillowcase and everything that keeps you up at night. For this week, we’re crawling our way into the turn of the millennium.

— Mary Elizabeth Johnson, Daily Arts Writer

Thursday, October 15, 2020 - 6:27pm
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Halloween is a month-long celebration that spans decades of movie history, from Southern Gothic to psychothriller. The film beat decided to embrace this history, dedicating each week of October to a different time period in horror. This series celebrates every nightmare you had when you were ten, every creak in the floorboards of an old house, every piece of candy stuck to the inside of your pillowcase and everything that keeps you up at night. For this week, we’re tiptoeing our way into the ‘70s and early ‘80s. 

Thursday, October 8, 2020 - 10:59am
NOSELL

Halloween is a month-long celebration that spans decades of movie history, from Southern Gothic to psychothriller. The film beat embraces this history, dedicating each week of October to a different time period of horror. This series celebrates every nightmare you had when you were ten, every creak in the floorboards of an old house, every piece of candy stuck to the inside of your pillowcase and everything that keeps you up at night. For this week, we’re sticking to the beginnings of modern horror: Hitchcock’s reign of the ’60s. 

Sunday, September 20, 2020 - 5:34pm
NOSELL

Disney has long been the big name in animation. That being so, many have lamented Disney’s transition to the three-dimensional, computer-generated style that began with 2006’s “Chicken Little” and made waves after breaking into princess territory with 2010’s “Tangled.” We already had Pixar (which itself was readily swallowed by the ever-mushrooming mouse conglomerate in 2006), and DreamWorks abandoned 2D stuff in the early 2000s, so why change things up, why the homogeneity?

Thursday, September 10, 2020 - 2:00pm
NOSELL

“It stays, it sticks, it lingers, it dominates …”

These words are spoken by Jessie Buckley’s (“Judy”) character in the Netflix original film “I’m Thinking of Ending Things.” In the context of the film, this refers to the thought of ending things, but the line just as easily applies to the way “I’m Thinking of Ending Things” imprints itself on the viewer. 

Monday, August 31, 2020 - 11:19am
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In a parallel world, moviegoers, blissfully unaware of the COVIDs and the Faucis and the curves — flattened or otherwise —  are settling down in front of the silver screen at their favorite theater for a rare Hungarian treat.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020 - 6:59pm
NOSELL

Movies are projections. Yes, literally, in the sense of filmstock and screens and projectors and bulbs. But movies can also be projections of ourselves — a momentary snapshot of the internal, the introspective, the metaphysical. And given the circumstances, we as the film beat are seeing less literal projections in movie theaters and doing more projecting ourselves. So what are we thinking about? Among them are Tik Toks, Tiger King and — of course — the apocalypse. This series will traverse the cinematic doomsday in its eclectic iterations.

Sunday, March 8, 2020 - 4:30pm
NOSELL

As I settled into the new Netflix original drama “All the Bright Places,” directed by Brett Haley (“Hearts Beat Loud”) and adapted from (and co-written by) Jennifer Niven’s popular YA novel of the same name, it quickly seemed like it would be another mawkish romance populated by tired gender tropes.