Sunday, February 28, 2021 - 6:34pm
NOSELL

It is always exciting to get a look behind the curtain. In R.J. Cutler’s (“Belushi”) new documentary, “Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Blurry,” he lifts the veil on the pop icon, who turns out to be just another teenager. In 140 minutes, Cutler mixes concert videography, home video and backstage footage of Eilish’s life to tell the story of superstardom. 

Tuesday, February 23, 2021 - 2:35pm
NOSELL

So, people are mad at the best voice actor in “Shark Tale” again. 

Monday, February 22, 2021 - 5:11pm
NOSELL

“Only Yesterday” is my favorite Studio Ghibli film, hands down. Its story is simple: Taeko, a 27-year-old woman living in Tokyo, takes a couple of days off from her mundane job in the city to work in the countryside, where she helps farmers as they prepare for the safflower harvest. Compared to the premises of other Ghibli movies, you might think that “Only Yesterday” would be boring, but you’d be sorely mistaken. 

Wednesday, February 17, 2021 - 4:08pm
NOSELL

After his alarm goes off and he takes his breakfast to go, Mark (Kyle Allen, “All My Life”) goes through a repetitive morning, throwing an empty coffee cup into a garbage truck approaching at just the right time. He gives a pedestrian directions before she asks. This is the premise of “The Map of Tiny Perfect Things:” Mark knows every event that is about to occur, until he meets an aggressive and rather disheveled Margaret (Kathryn Newton, “Big Little Lies”) wearing aviators and an oversized sweatshirt.

Tuesday, February 16, 2021 - 3:21pm
NOSELL

The studio that enchanted us as children with Hayao Miyazaki’s “Spirited Away” and “My Neighbor Totoro” has released its first film in six years. “Earwig and the Witch” is a far cry from these old-school illustrated films, venturing into the world of 3D CGI. Directed by Miyazaki’s son, Gorō Miyazaki (“From Up on Poppy Hill”), the movie follows Earwig (Taylor Henderson, “Evil Lives Here”), a mischievous and manipulative, though entirely kindhearted, young girl who grows up in an orphanage.

Monday, February 15, 2021 - 1:59pm
NOSELL

It’s the end of an era. As I sat down to watch the third and final installment of the “To All the Boys” trilogy, I reflected on the last three years of these movies. Based on the novel written by Jenny Han, “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before” came out in 2018, a world that now feels drastically different from the one we’re living in today. It was a simpler time, and the first film reflects this fact. 

Sunday, February 14, 2021 - 6:49pm
NOSELL

Jenny Slate (“Gifted”) cries a lot in “Obvious Child.” My sister makes fun of me because I have a running list of the best crying faces in film (at the top is Rooney Mara in “The Social Network”), and she reminds me that the ability to cry on camera doesn’t automatically meet the criteria for a good actor. 

Wednesday, February 10, 2021 - 5:20pm
NOSELL

There’s a quote from a 1964 speech by Malcolm X that Fred Hampton, played by Daniel Kaluuya (“Get Out”), recounts to the future mother of his child, Deborah (Dominique Fishback, “The Hate You Give”):

“Sometimes, when a person’s house is on fire and someone comes in yelling fire, instead of the person who is awakened by the yell being thankful, he makes the mistake of charging the one who awakened him with having set the fire.”

Tuesday, February 9, 2021 - 1:20pm
NOSELL

After a long and successful night, Malcolm (John David Washington, “Tenet”) and his girlfriend Marie (Zendaya, “Euphoria”) come home to eat mac and cheese. They’ve just been to Malcolm’s movie premiere where he, as the writer/director, received very positive feedback from several critics. As he turns up some music and dances around the house, relishing the night, Marie (not so subtly) hints that she is less than pleased. But Malcolm is too in his head to notice.

Monday, February 8, 2021 - 4:34pm
NOSELL

It’s been a while since I’ve been so utterly enthralled by a thriller. “The Little Things,” directed by John Lee Hancock (“The Blind Side”), begins with fear and ends with a lie. Set in Los Angeles, 1990, the film is led by three Academy Award winners: Denzel Washington (“Fences”) and Rami Malek (“Bohemian Rhapsody”) star as Joe Deacon and Jim Baxter respectively, alongside Jared Leto (“Suicide Squad”) as lead suspect Albert Sparma.