Sunday, March 15, 2020 - 11:41pm
NOSELL

Let’s paint a picture. It’s Saturday night at Skeeps. Your $12 Moscow Mule pitcher is running dry. “Down” by Jay Sean is blasting on the speakers. Everyone’s losing it. Luckily, you lock eyes with that special someone from across the muddied dance floor. You find your way through the crowd and begin to hit the basics: Name, major, hometown, your least favorite President of the University whose last name starts with an “S.” Next thing you know, you’re in a Lyft back to their place.

Sunday, March 15, 2020 - 9:40pm
NOSELL

You know those television shows that begin by stating they were filmed in front of a live studio audience? Until recently, I never understood the significance of it — not just what it meant for that particular show, but also for television as a whole. 

Sunday, March 15, 2020 - 7:11pm
NOSELL

I have a complicated relationship with the world of animation. I was raised in the caring arms of Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon. As a kid I would come home from school, crash on the couch and watch episodes of “Avatar: The Last Airbender,” “Regular Show,” “Adventure Time” … the list goes on and on. When I got older, I started wading my way into the more mature side of animation. I found myself strangely attracted to staples of American “adult animation,” i.e. “Family Guy,” “The Simpsons,” etc. 

Sunday, March 8, 2020 - 10:10pm
NOSELL

As “Better Call Saul” begins its fifth and penultimate season, it continues to inch closer to the timeline of the “Breaking Bad” universe. Last season saw the addition of undercover meth distributor-businessman Gus Fring (Giancarlo Esposito, “Breaking Bad”) and in its most recent episode, it appears DEA Agent Hank Schrader (Dean Norris, “Superstore”) will also play a major role in the coming seasons.

Sunday, March 8, 2020 - 4:12pm
NOSELL

It’s finally happening. Americans at large are starting to realize that not all good television and cinema has to be in the English language. In this peculiar moment of our history, critics and audience members are finally starting to give notice to ”Babylon Berlin.” 

Sunday, February 23, 2020 - 4:45pm
NOSELL

The concept behind the YouTube series “Hot Ones” is simple: Take the typical celebrity interview and spice it up with some hot wings. The show is extremely well researched, insightful and genuine. TruTV has decided to adapt “Hot Ones” into a game show on its channel: “Hot Ones: The Game Show.” The game show centers around two teams of “bros” as they devour some hot wings and answer some trivia for a cash prize. 

Sunday, February 23, 2020 - 4:08pm
NOSELL

Adapted from the hit podcast of the same name, Epix’s new docu-series “Slow Burn” — which details the people involved in the events of the Watergate Scandal — has joined the trend of podcast-turned-television shows, and it certainly will not be the last. In our current media climate, the endless profit possibilities that different intellectual properties offer has nearly every network or platform scrambling to attain the rights to reproduce stories we’ve already heard before, but just on their platform.

Sunday, February 16, 2020 - 4:20pm
NOSELL

You know those shows that have a season-ending cliffhanger that makes you scream to yourself, “HOW IN THE WORLD AM I SUPPOSED TO WAIT FOUR MONTHS TO FIND OUT WHAT HAPPENS?” Well, it’s been years since the season seven finale of “Homeland” and somewhere along the way, I stopped caring. 

Sunday, February 9, 2020 - 4:07pm
NOSELL

“Briarpatch” opens on a 99-degree morning in San Bonifacio, Texas. A landlady, who is also a police detective, exits her apartment to inquire about the rent from a standoffish upstairs tenant. She gets into her cruiser to leave for work and is promptly killed in a car-bomb explosion.

Sunday, February 9, 2020 - 4:03pm
NOSELL

It’s unfair to compare NBC’s new comedy “Indebted” to the recently departed “The Good Place” just because they’re both NBC comedies that air on Thursdays. These shows have little in common — nowhere are their differences more evident than in the execution of their respective premises. “The Good Place” took one of the most complex sitcom premises on network television and accomplished it with ease. On the other end of the sitcom spectrum, “Indebted” takes one of the most basic premises and struggles to give its audience a reason to care.