Monday, October 19, 2020 - 12:13pm
NOSELL

Dressed in expensive fashion, the first characters we meet in the new Netflix mini-series “Someone Has to Die” are Cayetana (Ester Expósito, “Elite”) and her brother Alonso (Carlos Cuevas, “Merlí. Sapere Aude”), who pass time shooting pigeons at their family range. Cayetana tells her brother that someone named Gabino has finally returned to marry her. He freezes. Before we can decide whether it’s out of anger or worry, Alonso takes aim, screams and shoots. 

Monday, October 19, 2020 - 12:10pm
NOSELL

One of the biggest problems with social distancing in the COVID-era is the extreme, unrelenting boredom that comes with it. There are simply too many hours in a day to actually keep oneself completely occupied. Movies and TV shows are the things that are supposed to keep us from feeling completely empty for the majority of the day. Enter Netflix’s “Social Distance,” a show dedicated to reminding the audience how bored they actually are. 

Sunday, October 11, 2020 - 7:15pm
NOSELL

Have you ever wanted to explore the minds of people you don’t normally see on TV? To challenge what you know about our country’s history, and to see one of the most significant moments in humankind from a whole new perspective?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, do not watch the new Disney+ anthology series “The Right Stuff.” It won’t give you any of the above.

Sunday, October 11, 2020 - 6:23pm
NOSELL

There’s a common phenomenon that occurs in the wake of radical new inventions, including anything from the printing press to the atom bomb — the moment when society looks at a technological innovation and asks, “Has technology gone too far?”

Sunday, October 11, 2020 - 6:17pm
NOSELL

After months of themed dinners, Zoom family reunions and newfound quarantine hobbies, the coronavirus pandemic has provided us with a new shared subculture. In spite of the hardships Americans faced throughout all stages of this ongoing quarantine, we have found ways to remain connected with the people we love most. 

Sunday, October 11, 2020 - 6:12pm
NOSELL

When fans first watched “The Haunting of Hill House” in late 2018, they were in for a wild ride. The show balanced truly terrifying moments with superb storytelling, taking the average ghost story and twisting it to create a groundbreaking work in horror. Thus, it came as no surprise that there was so much early enthusiasm for Mike Flanagan’s follow-up “The Haunting of Bly Manor.” But unlike “Hill House,” “Bly Manor“ fails to leave the impact of its masterful predecessor.

Monday, October 5, 2020 - 11:41am
NOSELL

According to the Center for Disease Prevention and Control, approximately one in six American children have a diagnosable developmental disorder, such as autism, speech-related impairments or cerebral palsy.

Monday, October 5, 2020 - 11:39am
NOSELL

What do an R&B singer-songwriter, a genius playwright, a rock ‘n’ roll legend and a California hitmaker all have in common? To any practical person, they are all insane. But they’ve also come together as subjects for the four-part docuseries “Song Exploder,” hosted by Hrishikesh Hirway, which emerged from the popular podcast of the same name. Each episode focuses on one of these iconic musical artists and takes fans on a televised journey, revealing how their most beloved songs were created.

Monday, October 5, 2020 - 11:38am
NOSELL

In the world of “South Park,” the only cardinal sin is self-righteousness — the attitude that personal beliefs and convictions are completely unassailable. Whether it’s religion or race, politics or personality, Trey Parker and Matt Stone (“The Book of Mormon”) always manage to blur the lines between sacred and immoral, showing that both sides of any debate are odious.

Monday, October 5, 2020 - 11:36am
NOSELL

Let me just complain for a minute: Paris. I was supposed to go to Paris last May. Spring. In Paris. For a week. To visit a friend. Let me just repeat: Spring, in Paris, with other college juniors. And then the virus hit Europe and the trip was canceled. Understandable, it is a pandemic after all. So, imagine, how excited I was for “Emily in Paris” — a moment in October, in the middle of midterms, to leave Ann Arbor and enjoy the escapism that is, in essence, a glorified romantic comedy? Count me in.