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Friday, November 28, 2014

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Research

Protein research could unlock new disease cures

BY TOM MCBRIEN

In a recently published paper titled “Polyphosphate Is a Primordial Chaperone,” researchers from Biology Prof. Ursula Jakob’s lab explain how a molecule called inorganic polyphosphate can act as a chaperone, meaning it helps proteins to fold into the complex 3-D shapes that dictate their functions.

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Ice levels on Great Lakes reach highest point in decades

BY IAN DILLINGHAM

As students return home for spring break, those who live in coastal regions surrounding the Great Lakes could witness some of the highest ice levels in decades.

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Contest winners explore genetic anlysis

BY IAN DILLINGHAM

At the intersection of business and science, University researchers are looking to find innovative solutions to some complex genetic puzzles — and now they are getting some help.

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Scientists appeal to public for more funds

BY IAN DILLINGHAM

Todd Herron, professor of molecular and integrative physiology, and his team of researchers at the University’s Center for Arrhythmia Research plan to use an innovative form of fundraising, known as crowdfunding, to support their research into inherited cardiac arrhythmia diseases — a disorder passed from one generation to the next that causes the heart to beat irregularly.

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Researchers probe West Nile virus and Dengue fever

BY ANASTASSIOS ADAMOPOULOS

In a recently published study, researchers from the University and Purdue University reported new findings that could help better understand and treat of a pair of deadly mosquito-born diseases: West Nile fever and Dengue fever. The report was the first to outline the structure of the NS1 protein responsible for helping the viruses spread.

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Engineering professor works to prepare for epidemics

BY PAULA FRIEDRICH

Engineering Prof. Siqian Shen and collaborators from Sandia National Laboratories, a contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy, have created an optimization model that could help public health officials make decisions about which places to close in epidemic situations.

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A New Leader

As researcher, Schlissel was a prominent immunologist

BY AUSTEN HUFFORD

For many senior scientific researchers at universities, their days are spent writing grants and telling younger researchers what to do. Even though they are in charge of a lab, their actual lab time becomes nonexistent. But University President-elect Mark Schlissel continued to work in his lab and run experiments even as he climbed the academic ladder at the University of California, Berkeley.

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Study examines stem cell role in breast cancer care

BY KAITLIN ZURDOSKY

Researchers at the University’s Comprehensive Cancer Center have discovered new clues as to how to treat patients with cancer.

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University leads charge in national anti-smoking effort

BY KAITLIN ZURDOSKY

As research on the dangers of smoking continues to accumulate, the University’s smoke-free initiative is proving to be a model for institutions across the nation.

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University protein research could lead to better drug treatment

BY TOM MCBRIEN

Much like students at a club on a Saturday night, proteins can act differently when crowded together than when they are more spread out. A team of University researchers is at the forefront of studying this phenomenon as they focus on how water acts between proteins surrounded by bulky molecules, known as crowded proteins.

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