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'American Idol' winner David Cook talks TV's golden ticket

RCA

By Tehreem Sajjad, Daily Arts Writer
Published October 18, 2013

In 2008, David Cook won the seventh season of “American Idol,” and this weekend, as Cook tours the United States with Gavin DeGraw, he’ll visit Ann Arbor to deliver one of his high-caliber and emotionally provoking performances at The Ark.

As a singer, songwriter and musician, Cook is an artist who never fails to put his heart on the line for his music, and he’s been that way from a young age.

“Music kind of, for me, has been a bit therapeutic,” Cook said. “I turned to songwriting to try to take whatever negative energy and angst you have as a teenager and present it in a socially acceptable way. Fortunately, I’ve been able to … make a career out of it.”

Though he didn’t originally plan to participate in “American Idol,” Cook has high regard for the show and appreciates where it has gotten him today.

“I think I was at an amazing platform,” Cook said. “The common misconception is that it’s a golden ticket and everybody who wins the show is going to be huge. But it gives you a moment, and you have to seize that moment.

“I think there are people that probably try out for the show to be famous and there are people who try out because they love music and want to make a career out of it. As long as the intentions are pure, ‘Idol’ can do whatever you want it to do for you.”

Following his triumph on “American Idol,” Cook’s debut single, “Light On,” went platinum and hit Billboard Hot 100’s Top 20 songs in 2009. Cook released his second album, This Loud Morning, after completing his first major yearlong tour. This Loud Morning featured tracks written and co-written by Cook along with many acclaimed songwriters, including David Hodges, Ryan Tedder, Kevin Griffin and Marti Frederiksen.

For all young aspiring artists, Cook gives the same piece of advice that was given to him as he found his place in the music industry.

“If you really want to get into the music industry, you need get used to the word ‘no,’ ” Cook said. “I think for every one time I’ve heard ‘yes,’ I’ve probably heard ‘no’ about a hundred times more. If you can get through the ‘no’ s, you can usually find a career for yourself.”

This weekend, along with performing some old material, Cook will play several new songs.

“I see people familiar with the two RCA records, so there will be a lot for them to hear. We’re also working on a new record,” Cook said. “This whole tour came about as a way to get new songs out, really let us test some new material.”


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